Luke Annetts takes over Tenterfield Veterinary Clinic

NEW HANDS: Dr Luke Annetts and mate Belle, a failed working dog but a great companion, have taken over the Tenterfield Veterinary Clinic.

NEW HANDS: Dr Luke Annetts and mate Belle, a failed working dog but a great companion, have taken over the Tenterfield Veterinary Clinic.

Growing up in Glen Innes with two GPs as parents turned Luke Annetts off becoming a doctor, but his love of horses and other animals led him from an early age in the direction of becoming a vet.

After completing his studies at Murdoch University in Perth and then serving seven years in a mixed practice in Bundaberg, Luke has again moved closer to home, taking over the Tenterfield Veterinary Clinic from Pip Bacon. Pip will remain on a part-time basis, doing the Tuesday Texas run and a couple of days in the practice.

Luke said he took up the opportunity to buy the business as it’s in a good area and closer to family, and it’s a good, established practice. His preference is for larger animals, and on graduation he received the Australian Veterinary Association’s prize for the highest marks in equine in the final year, and also an annual prize for the most competent student in equine medicine and equine surgery.

He said dogs, cats and other small animals all have their challenges as well.

It’s something he can hold over his parents Doctors Peter and Trish Annetts, long term stalwarts of the Glen Innes medical community. Luke was born in Glen Innes in 1983, soon after his parents commenced general practice there. He went on to attend Glen Innes Public School and Glen Innes High School.

“Real doctors treat more than one species,” Luke always tells his parents.

He said there is some common ground, particularly with zoonotic diseases than can cross from animal to human. His parents are happy with his career choice as long as he’s happy.

Luke said he’s in Tenterfield for the long term, but aims to get ‘home’ as much as possible. Christmas, though, was spent working and ensuring the practice was ticking along smoothly.

He’s ably aided by fellow full time vets Kate Wilson and Tamara Birrer (plus Pip part-time), and doesn’t anticipate any major changes to the practice.

“We just want to keep on looking after everyone and continue to provide the same breadth of services, with our animal hospital and with cars on the road doing outcalls,” he said.

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