Have you seen a Peppered Tree Frog?

A rare photograph of a Peppered Tree Frog last seen in Glen Innes nearly 50 years ago.
A rare photograph of a Peppered Tree Frog last seen in Glen Innes nearly 50 years ago.

There are something like 17 endangered species of frog in the area, according to an expert who explained their difficult circumstances to a meeting in Glen Innes.

Sophie Collins of the University of New England said that frogs were a good indicator of the wider biological health of a region so if they were under threat the likelihood was that other species were, too.

​In the meeting organised by the Glen Innes Natural Resources Advisory Committee, she described her three-year project to document the presence of different types of frog in the Northern Tablelands.  She will then compare the results with those from a survey done forty years ago.

The ‘Save Our Threatened Species’ meeting was aimed at land managers and local people to keep them informed about species which are under threat in the locality.

Sophie Collins mentioned research being carried out by the Australian Museum into the extremely rare Peppered Tree Frog last seen in Glen Innes in the 1970s.

She said that anyone with running streams near their homes might contact the museum or GLENRAC because it was the kind of habit where rare frogs might have survived.

Already there’s a project at Glen Innes High School to create a garden on the school grounds to protect another type of local threatened frog, the Booroolong Frog. Peta Perrin from the school talked about her work with students.  

The background to the wider ecology was described by Dr Mahri Koch, an expert in the Gondwana Rainforests in this area.