Glen Innes World War I veteran remembered on eve of Remembrance Day

LEST WE FORGET: After the war, Oscar Ogle worked for Glen Innes council. He also ran a market garden and supplied vegetables to the Dragon Court Chinese Restaurant.

LEST WE FORGET: After the war, Oscar Ogle worked for Glen Innes council. He also ran a market garden and supplied vegetables to the Dragon Court Chinese Restaurant.

OSCAR Ogle ranked just one sentence in The Examiner when he was awarded the Military Medal in 1918.

Between the report of Brisbane’s mayoral elections and the death of an obscure marquis, this newspaper reported, “Private Oscar Ogle, of Stonehenge, who is with the Australian troops in Palestine, has won the Military Medal.”

One hundred years later and on Saturday, Remembrance Day, the digger will be remembered and honoured at the lunch service in Anzac Park, Glen Innes.

Glen Innes RSL Sub branch president Gordon Taylor said this year’s events marking Remembrance Day at Glen Innes would be relatively low key.

“There will be a service at 10.25am in Anzac Park, as well as a lunch at Glen Innes Services Club,” Mr Taylor said.

But Lance Corporal Ogle’s achievement will be remembered, with surviving family expected to be at the service.

Of the 416,809 Australian men who served in World War I, just 9926 were awarded the Military Medal.

Ogle must have enlisted early in the war effort, since his service number was 602.

Little is known about where he enlisted, however, in early November, Ogle found himself fighting the Ottomon Army in the Battle of Tel Khuweilfeh, 16 kilometres north of Beersheba.

The battle proved a turning point in Palestine, since the Ottomons were forced out.

On November 6, while attached to the 2nd Australian Machine Gun squadron, Ogle was shot in the arm.

But not before he “withdrew a machine gun from an exposed position after its crew had been killed or wounded”, according to Ogle’s medal citation.

“This action allowed the gun to be brought into action on a new position and served by Ogle himself, enabling troops to come up and reinforce that position.”

It was a far cry from Glencoe Public School, where the former schoolboy’s name featured prominently on its honour roll.

Ogle was hospitalised five different times throughout the war. After serving, Ogle returned to Glen Innes, marrying Florence May Ruming in June, 1924. They had four children, Bruce is the only surviving child. He died in 1980, aged 84.