Glen Innes History: Stock and station agents of change

Faces of the past: Claude Bloxsome on the left and other local stock and station agents on the right.
Faces of the past: Claude Bloxsome on the left and other local stock and station agents on the right.

“Until 1957, all the Glen Innes agents were owners of their own businesses.

“Wool firms, Australian Estates, Dalgetys, Elder Smith, and Winchcombe Carsons bought into the town in 1957 and AML&F followed in 1964...” from Z. Boyd Law, Fifty Years of the Glen Innes Agents,  1971.

Stock Inspector Frank Forster left Goulburn and joined Country Life newspaper in 1937 and his skilful caricatures sometimes signed “Gill Guy”  were well known.

These sketches are of Glen Innes local stock and station agents Bruce Gillies, Maurice Ewing, Gwen McGregor, A. E. Pearson and Loudon McRae.

From a small beginning of about 20 bulls, mainly herefords, sold with top price of 75 guineas, the yarding has increased over the years to about 360 bulls...

The photo on the left is of Claude Bloxsome who commenced business in 1927 in the magnificent old two-storey Tattersalls building in Grey Street, now replaced by New Tattersalls Hotel-Motel.

Bruce Gillies was in partnership with him for a while until he joined his brother Fletcher to form Gillies Brothers Agency.

When this happened, Claude moved to the southern end of Grey Street.

“...In 1946, he started the first bull sale for Glen Innes. From a small beginning of about 20 bulls, mainly herefords, sold with top price of 75 guineas, the yarding has increased over the years to about 360 bulls sold in 1970 with a top price of $2700.

“In 1949, he sold to the Commonwealth Wool and Produce Co, but remained as manager until he left in 1951. In 1955, Nenco took over, until in 1957 Elder Smith bought the agency…”

Miss Gwen McGregor took over The Glen Innes Agency from her father, DMG McGregor and became the local Nenco agent from 1934.

Brown and (Loudon) McRae agency was where Graydon’s pharmacy is now. After Mr Brown died in 1928, Mr N. Lyall took his place and the agency moved to the popular Tattersalls building.

Maurice Ewing worked in with Loudon and after the death of his partner he sold to Hugh Hutchison.

A. E. Pearson had an auction mart and conducted his small business on the northern side Bourke Street.

Agents’ work usually went late into the night on the phone – hopefully, mobile phones have made their lives somewhat easier.