History Matters || A master tailor in high demand

Margaret Fulton in white bonnet and her father Sandy, the older gentleman in the centre of the photo taken in the Old Hospital Courtyard c. 1928.
Margaret Fulton in white bonnet and her father Sandy, the older gentleman in the centre of the photo taken in the Old Hospital Courtyard c. 1928.

In Keeping Family Treasures by Elizabeth Masters and Ian Batterham, 2010, Margaret Fulton tells of her early life here.

"My father was a master tailor in the little country town of Glen Innes in NSW.

"When I visited him he would send across to the pastry shop and buy a round plump snail bun with pink icing for me.

"He used to cut it with these great heavy shears and pop a piece into my mouth .

"It was fascinating to see the scissors cutting up that pastry.

"I knew mother wouldn't approve so it was secret between Dad and me."

Margaret was brought up in northern Scotland where her father made hunting, shooting and fishing gear for the aristocracy.

Her parents and their six children came out to Australia from Glasgow by ship when she was about three, the youngest of the family.

"My father was encouraged to come to Australia by someone he worked with in Scotland. The friend came back and said Australia was a land of golden opportunity.

"Father was a wonderful optimist and wonderfully cheerful sort of person."

Alexander who died at the age of 96 had brought the shears out from Scotland with him.

"Alexander Fulton's talents were in high demand, with people travelling to Glen Innes from as far as Sydney to have their garments made.

"There was a shortage of tailors of his quality so he got a reputation.

"Although there were good tailors in Sydney, my father was a favourite and people felt it was worthwhile travelling to have their garments made by him."

The shears are now among Margaret's treasured belongings.

When Sandy sold his shop, the shears were sold and it was only many years later when Margaret was in Glen Innes that that person's son, much to Margaret's delight, returned them to her.

The courtyard in what is now the Land of the Beardies Museum will again ring with the sound of bagpipes as well as the beautiful singing of Ella Roberts on the night of Thursday, May 2 when the historical society stages another special Celtic dinner night, celebrating Scotland.

Bookings only though the museum 02 67 32 1035 or museum@gleninneshistory.com.au