History Matters || Tattersalls a hotel equal to the best

Tattersalls Hotel, circa 1900, possibly when Joshua Scholes was the licensee.
Tattersalls Hotel, circa 1900, possibly when Joshua Scholes was the licensee.

The subsequent building on the site of the Tattersalls Hotel Motel has recently been sold and renovations are in progress.

Many will remember the splendour of the original Tattersalls Hotel, built on the site of the Commercial Hotel in 1875 by Glen Innes' second mayor, Samuel Bowler Redgate.

In 1905 it was owned by G and A Vivers and run by C Finney and renovations prompted this article in the Queenslander July 1, 1905.

"The hotel accommodation to be found in Glen Innes is equal to the best outside the metropolis, and Tattersall's Hotel which has justly earned the appellation 'a home form home' provides all the comfort and convenience to be obtained in the best-regulated city hotels... the proprietor has spared no pains and has added hot and cold water service to the hotel.

"There are 54 commodious bedrooms, besides numerous drawing rooms and parlours.

"There are six bathrooms upstairs, there are also six lavatories fitted with the latest appliances.

"There are two staircases and three fire escapes.

"There are telephones and electric bells installed throughout ... the kitchen is supplied with the latest Waygoods patent elevator. The gas fittings are the latest and best descriptions.

"Tattersalls is undoubtedly one of the best appointed and most complete residential hotels in the state and is a tribute to the energy and progressive spirit of the proprietor, to the taste and ability of the architect  (Mr J F O'Connor of Inverell and Glen Innes) and to the resources of the contractor for the building (Mr G F Nott of Armidale).

"The painting throughout is artistic in every way, and the ornamentation of a character very seldom seen outside our large cities, the whole of this work has been carried out by Mr G B Clark painter Glen Innes ...

"Access is gained to the upper rooms by a handsome and inviting polished cedar staircase... numerous and spacious corridors lead throughout the building ... the western end of the vestibule opens into the conservatory and fernery."

A commercial traveller's room and 16 large loose boxes were other amenities.

Guests names were often recorded in the Examiner.

In 1961 the hotel was demolished Mr Burnstein, who built the present Tattersalls Hotel Motel.

More History Matters from Eve Chappell

The hotel accommodation to be found in Glen Innes is equal to the best outside the metropolis.