Glen Innes firefighters prepare to join Firies Climb for Motor Neuron Disease

A quintet of Glen Innes firefighters including Nigel Sharman, Damien Hallcroft, Rick Ott, Jason Dejong and (absent) Bronwyn Waters will tackle Sydney's Centrepoint tower tomorrow.

A quintet of Glen Innes firefighters including Nigel Sharman, Damien Hallcroft, Rick Ott, Jason Dejong and (absent) Bronwyn Waters will tackle Sydney's Centrepoint tower tomorrow.

A quintet of Glen Innes firefighters preparing to climb Sydney's tallest building have raised more than $8000 to fight motor-neuron disease.

They are set to climb the 1504 steps of Sydney's Centrepoint tower tomorrow morning - wearing full uniform and 20 kilograms of gear.

Between wood raffles, barbeques, a successful golf fundraiser, and a massive $5000 donation by Glen Innes charitable champion Charlie Sutton the town has thrown their support behind their effort.

Fire and Rescue retained firefighter Nigel Sharman said the Glen Innes team have already banked $7500, and could raise more than $9000 once all donations are accounted for.

But will they do as well tomorrow at the actual climb?

The tower is 309 metres high, 98 storeys, Mr Sharman admitted the 1504 steps were a "bit nerve wracking".

"I think my training has been a bit slack for the last two months, slackened off a bit but a lot of people are very keen, dedicated trainers and some aren't," he said.

"We'll find out when Saturday comes."

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The team, Fire and Rescue firefighters Nigel Sharman and Damien Hallcroft, plus rural firefighters Rick Ott, Jason Dejong and Bronwyn Waters, have been allocated a time between 10 and 11 tomorrow morning to complete the climb. It should take about half an hour, or less.

King's Gym has helped them with training and advice - the key is mostly leg strength and cardio, Nigel said, plus diet.

"Comes down to Saturday morning, or Friday night - eating right, having not too big a breakfast, having the right meals before it.

"Many times we've gone to fires, worked hard and feeling like you want to throw up later on, maybe because you've had something wrong to eat that's reacted to the hard work and the heat and stuff."

But with bushfires flaring up around the New England region, one firefighter said he wasn't sure if he could make it.

"And I said to him look, it's only the start of the season, there's going to be many more fires. There's many firiefighters here that can do the job for the three days you're away for," said Nigel Sharman.

"I'm sure you can have three days off and go down to Sydney and do something good for a good cause.

"There'll be fires burning when we get back we can get onto."

Will they do it again?

"That's something we're going to see after the climb," Nigel joked.

"It's something I think I'd like to do again, but we won't know until Saturday night or Sunday.

"How I wake up in the morning and how I feel will be another thing but I think a few of the other fellows are a bit daunted by it too, they're a bit nervous."

The Firies Climb for Motor Neuron Disease has this year raised $668,739.62 at time of writing. Every cent will go to the Macquarie University Centre for Motor Neuron Disease Research.

This is the first time Glen Innes has entered a team.

Motor neuron disease, also known as Lou Gehrigs Disease, is the name for a group of horrendous muscle degenerative disorders that gradual destroys your ability to control your own voluntary muscles, eventually causing death. It has no cure. Some are born with the disease as children, but it can also affect adults.

Possibly the world's most famous victim of the disease was scientist Stephen Hawking, who lived with the condition for 45 years.