Ross Kamphorst takes over from dad at Ag station

Ross Kamphorst is the Glen Innes Agriculture Station's new farm supervisor.
Ross Kamphorst is the Glen Innes Agriculture Station's new farm supervisor.

Ross Kamphorst might be the Glen Innes Agriculture Station's new top farmer, but he's a familiar face nonetheless.

His dad Peter Kamphorst worked at the research station for forty years and knew the place better than most, said Ross.

The young Glen Innes farmer and welder took over as farm supervisor last month, replacing the old farm foreman of 18 years.

And it wasn't the first time he worked at the station either: when he was younger he chipped in to help out, doing a bit of child labour that is common throughout agriculture.

"On the odd weekend I'd come across giving dad a bit of a hand," he said.

"I don't know how that's looked upon these days!"

Now he runs a team of five to assist the research staff with the practical side of agriculture, helping keep the cattle and sheep they study in control.

"I've been around it my whole life."

He's come to the job a bit sideways, after working for six years as a welder in Glen Innes and then on mining and construction out of town.

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He opened his own business, helping farmers with both welding and fabrication.

"Wherever there's metal that meets metal that's me I'm in the middle."

The best thing about the job is working on ground-breaking research projects, collaborating with stations across the state; at the moment that's the super genomics project.

It's a very creative environment at the station, he said, with a mix of staff from local land services, vets and state government agronomists and scientists.

"It's a great institute and infrastructure here and it's good that LLS staff can utilise the office space.

"It's a really good environment here; everyone's sort of bouncing off each other.

"There's a wealth of information in just those few people working here."

Peter Kamphorst worked at the research station for forty years. He knew the place better than most, said Ross.

Peter Kamphorst worked at the research station for forty years. He knew the place better than most, said Ross.

Will he stay at the job for forty years?

"Who knows.

"I've sort of settled; I've only been here a little while obviously but I've settled in and I'm enjoying the challenges and the role so far.

"We can hopefully make it a pretty long term career yet."

Peter Kamphorst worked as a livestock technical officer at the station. He retired around four years ago.