History Matters || Reflections of bygone era

Immigration promotion: Mothers meet in their hats, gloves, high heels and stockings, with their cane prams in Grey Street in the late 1940s.
Immigration promotion: Mothers meet in their hats, gloves, high heels and stockings, with their cane prams in Grey Street in the late 1940s.
 Fay and Barbara Readett in the 1950s wearing tartan skirts and hand knitted jumpers.

Fay and Barbara Readett in the 1950s wearing tartan skirts and hand knitted jumpers.

The late 1940s, '50s and '60s don't seem so long ago!

How different those days were, when weighty encyclopaedia or parents - not Google - were the fount of all knowledge.

Our music, photo album, atlas, games etc, were not all accommodated in one slim pocketable phone.

We listened to the Children's Hour and the Argonauts Club and posted off our fledgling attempts at writing, art, and music.

Puddings were Spanish cream, flummery, blancmange, junket, tapioca, sago, rice pudding.

There was jelly made from square lumps of stiff Cottees jellies - which were just as delicious when filched to be chewed neat.

Fizzy drinks, ice cream and sweets were a treat - maybe consumed at the Grand or Roxy picture theatres.

There was the joy of a pink iced cupcake in Hunt's cafe.

The milkman's horse ambled along as he dashed from house to house filling the jugs or saucepans set on the doorstep with the order and money.

And were not the gardeners happy when they were able to go out later and shovel up manure for the garden!

A bread man with large covered basket over his arm delivered bread that had to later be cut with a serrated knife on a bread board.

The butcher and grocer both called for the order which they later delivered.

Can anyone remember the Mackenzies delivery bicycle with its roomy basket on the front is in the museum, the Rawleigh's man, at the back door with his suitcase of vanilla, boot polish, and custard powder?

Our health was boosted by tonics of Malt extract, Iradol-A or Waterbury's compound.

We were dosed with Syrup of Figs, Agarol and castor oil to "keep us regular".

Bex Powders unfortunately stayed on the market far too long.

Sticky rolls of flypaper hung from the ceiling.

Cleaning necessitated a strong application of elbow grease with sand soap or O'Cedar floor polish.

Black lead was rubbed into the stove top and ochre and whitewash painted on the fireplace bricks.

This was the age of Holden cars, rope petticoats, pedal pushers, hula hoops, slicing soap for the copper.

Households carefully recycled brown paper and string.

Box Brownie cameras captured our lives and there was the long wait for the photographs to be developed at the chemist.

By the railway line there was the sign telling you how many miles to Griffiths Teas.

  • The main photo is from South West Pacific mag No 19 published by Dept of Information c.1948, this is the way Glen Innes was portrayed in an immigration promotion.