History Matters || Looking back at Emmaville Sunday school

SUNDAY SCHOOL: Peter Seymour, the son of the Emmaville vicar at the time, has been trying to identify the children pictured here in 1961.
SUNDAY SCHOOL: Peter Seymour, the son of the Emmaville vicar at the time, has been trying to identify the children pictured here in 1961.

The Rev Laurie Seymour was vicar of St Paul's Emmaville from 1959 to 1961.

His son Peter has sent this from his father's slide collection, of the Emmaville Sunday School Picnic July 1961.

Most of the boys and girls would now be about 65 and Peter has been trying to identify the children pictured.

Surely many of these faces will be familiar. Maybe you will need to search family photo albums to refresh memories.

He has numbered each for ease of identifying.

Peter has been putting on Facebook many other slides with scenes of Emmaville from those years.

Ian Lobsey wrote about St Pauls Emmaville in The Creek published in 1972:

"The records of the parish began on 17 July 1887 when the Rev John T Wrenford took up residence in Emmaville.

The records of the parish began on 17 July 1887.

Ian Lobsey

"The clergy from Tenterfield had covered this area until 1883 when the separate parish of Emmaville was formed, and the marriage of Jacob Anderson and Margaret Stewart McIntosh at St Paul's Church Vegetable Creek was recorded on 12 June 1882.

"Mr Wrenford became the first vicar of the parish and prior to his official induction he conducted his first service in St Pauls Church on 17 July 1887; on the following day he baptised Lewis Pentreath, the infant son of Charles and Rosetta Curnow and the first burial recorded is that of William Reed on 28 August... the restoration of the church was commenced in April and the reopening service held on 13 May.

"During the time of this work services were held in the Temperance Hall.

"The restoration was completed in time for the visit of the Bishop of Grafton and Armidale the Rt Rev J F Turner to the parish for the purpose of administering Confirmation to 16 males and 53 females.

"Initially Mr Wrenford conducted services at Emmaville and Dundee and the following years brought an enormous increase in the number of centres at which services were conducted," he wrote.

Localities noted in the early Register of Services for the region were Bismuth, Black Swamp, Bolivia, Cow Flat, Deepwater, Emmaville, Fladbury, Four Mile, Glen Creek, Glen View, Mariner's, Mount Mystery, Nine Mile, Ranger's Valley, Rocky Creek, Stannum, Tent Hill, The Glen, The Gulf, Torrington, Tungsten, Wallaroo, Wellington Vale and Wycliffe.

Most of these services no longer appear in the register by the 1920s.