Early days of golf in Glen

AS IT WAS: What the best dressed golfers once wore looks a lot different to the golf courses of today. Picture: Supplied

AS IT WAS: What the best dressed golfers once wore looks a lot different to the golf courses of today. Picture: Supplied

In 1922 a nine or 10 hole course (east of the Baths in the Police paddock) fenced with three strands of wire to exclude the cattle and a portion even classified as a stock route constituted the golf course.

It was the only course north of Murrurundi with turf greens.

Mr Les Powter, scythe on his back, cycled round the greens to cut feet high weeds and grass so Mr Charlie Kemp (bowling greens keeper) could mow; he transported his hand mower from green to green by wheelbarrow...

Councils action in leasing the grazing rights and fencing the area into paddocks (placing styles for player's thoroughfare) was one of the reasons that prompted the club to purchase 140 acres about five miles north of the town, in about 1928.

Members strenuous voluntary labour in blasting trees and rocks, defining fairways, and placing greens was somewhat cushioned by the golf associates providing them with lunch and afternoon tea.

On March 9, 1930, the new 18-hole golf course was opened. Mr Col Peglar's transport to the new links was 1/6 a head for groups of ten or more, or 2/- for less.

Mr Col Peglar's transport to the new links was 1/6 a head for groups of ten or more, or 2/- for less.

Re-sited and enlarged the old club house was opened on May 22, 1938. Links of a sort were constructed by an offshoot of the club at Martins Lookout (now site of the Standing Stones) and opened by the Mayor Ald. W J Watson who hit off on January 1, 1940, but the venture did not last long,

During World War II the Army took over the area where the second nine is now played.

After 1946 the upsurge in membership necessitated the employment of a groundsman. Eighteen grass greens and a putting green were opened in 1968.

The foresight of a small number of committee men was responsible for what is now a beautiful golf course, but most credit must go to the late Mr Cecil Judge, keen devotee of the game who gave countless hours of his time and energies to improve the course.

Much of the beauty now provided by the trees and general layout of the course is due to his dedication.

From Beardies Heritage 1972

Eve Chappell is the Research, Publicity and Promotions Coordinator at Glen Innes and District Historical Society