Glen Innes Correctional Centre team do the heavy lifting

Overseer, Craig Smith.
Overseer, Craig Smith.

A Northern Tablelands farmer has thanked Glen Innes Correctional Centre officers and inmates for helping him with work he couldn’t do because the drought was consuming so much of his time and energy.

Inverell farmer, Wayne Lowe, said the assistance from the correctional centre had been a huge blessing, with staff and inmates feeding ewes, measuring damaged fencing for replacement and cleaning out feed troughs.

“I can’t express how grateful I am for their support and was so impressed by how polite, respectful and helpful the inmates were,” Mr Lowe said.

“This is a huge job for me, and so when the team came out here to help, they picked it up quickly and just got on with the jobs with no dramas whatsoever.

“I really am just so thankful.”

Corrective Services NSW Overseer Craig Smith said the work involved doing a round-trip of 240km daily.

“As a farmer myself, I understand the challenges that are beyond one’s control and this drought is one of those things you can’t prepare for,” Mr Smith said.

“I came up with the idea to assist our farmers by providing this labour to hopefully help them back on track and to show them they aren’t alone in this.”

The Glen Innes project is one of many statewide initiatives planned by our correctional centres to offer assistance to farmers through our Community Project Teams.

Manager of Security, Rowena Mustard, overseer, Craig Smith, and farmer, Wayne Lowe.

Manager of Security, Rowena Mustard, overseer, Craig Smith, and farmer, Wayne Lowe.