Glen Innes show an opportunity to bridge rural-city divide

Cooper Nilon and Caitlin Grigg are all set and ready for the show after setting up in sideshow alley. Picture: Andrew Messenger
Cooper Nilon and Caitlin Grigg are all set and ready for the show after setting up in sideshow alley. Picture: Andrew Messenger

This year's show is an opportunity for rural and urban people to bridge the divide, says Andrew Hancock, show society president.

The 2019 show celebrity, Edwina Robertson, is helping to build that bridge. 

"She's a photographer who's bought pictures of the drought to the mainstream media and really put a face on the people it's affected."

This year's Glen Innes show is set to bring together farmers suffering from the drought

"‚ÄčIt's a great place to bridge that divide between city and country and see where you food comes from.

"Meet the people, just like you, that are farmers.

"It's good to bring people together, and it's an important thing to understand where your food comes from."

The show society is honouring its past as well as planning for the future.

They've installed a new garden honouring all show patrons from years past, in memory of long-time supporter Bill Hughes.

He was a patron for 60 years, one of 9 on the committee with more than 50 years of service.

"He just passed away last year so he got to see the 150 year celebrations.

"He received an award last year for 60 years of service to our committee - it was awarded to him by the (agricultural society council).

"He just loved the show and loved everything about it. He was still very involved right up to the end."

WINNERS: The premier store won this year's show window display competition.

WINNERS: The premier store won this year's show window display competition.

The show society awarded its annual show window display competition to the premier store.

Runners up were Rhubarb and Roses and highly commended went to the shopfronts of TSG Glen Innes and St Vincent de Paul.