Free tickets: Glen Innes show could be free thanks to Drought Communities Program

Local MPs Barnaby Joyce and Adam Marshall open the last Drought Communities Program project, with Mayor Carol Sparks, earlier this year.
Local MPs Barnaby Joyce and Adam Marshall open the last Drought Communities Program project, with Mayor Carol Sparks, earlier this year.

Tickets for the Glen Innes show will be free next year if the council is successful in applying for a Federal grant.

The council last night decided to apply for $70,000 worth of Federal government subsidy for the show through the Drought Communities Program.

The Program, which this year funded a brace of spending including a new bike and walking track, to hire a new GLENRAC drought support officer and new toilets, was rolled over into another round in early December.

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As a result councils across the country can apply for up to a million dollars worth of infrastructure spending.

At Thursday nights council meeting the Glen Innes Severn councilors unanimously decided to spend $320,000 of that money on a footpath upgrade, to fund another year of GLENRAC's drought support program and for free tickets to the show.

The council is throwing the balance of the cash open to the community, asking residents and groups to submit ideas for the remaining $680,000.

Ideas have to follow the program's strict eligibility guidelines and will have to be submitted to council for consideration by January 31 next year.

MP for New England Barnaby Joyce long lobbied for an additional round of the scheme, calling on the extension while opening Glen Innes' final project funded by the scheme.

"In my former capacity as the Special Envoy for Drought Assistance and Recovery, I fought for and delivered this funding last year and am proud to see its continuation to help support our towns and communities in drought," he said today.

"Mayors from across the electorate have told me how well this assistance has been received by helping to prop up local business, support jobs and drive new wealth back into the New England which has been heavily affected by drought and more recently, bushfire."